Friday, November 19, 2004

Porn equals heroin?

The AP runs an article reporting on a group of researchers calling on Congress to fund studies (presumably by those same researchers) on how addictive pornography is.

I'm not sure why porn's addictiveness isn't obvious to these folks. I guess it's possible that they are just porn fiends looking to get paid to do "research."

Anyway, they are calling for government action:

Mary Anne Layden, co-director of a sexual trauma program at the University of Pennsylvania, said pornography's effect on the brain mirrors addiction to heroin or crack cocaine. She told of one patient, a business executive, who arrived at his office at 9 a.m. each day, logged onto Internet porn sites, and didn't log off until 5 p.m.

Layden called for billboards and bus ads warning people to avoid pornography, strip clubs and prostitutes.

Is this type of thing really the government's business?

After eight years in the Army (where porn habits are near universal) I've seen how porn causes men to become so focused on their own gratification that they not only become narcissistic and view women as sub-human, but they destroy their own lives because of the poison in their minds, so you don't have to convince me on that count.

Though the federal government spends vast sums on programs much less worthy than this one, it will still take lots of convincing to get me to back anti-porn bus ads.

This problem needs a personal approach. I have no problem with local governments deciding to take some sort of action, but it should be more in line with self-help groups (like Alcoholics Anonymous) than billboards.

I'm still not sure where the FCC fits into this debate, but I have no doubt that television contributes to the porn problem, if only being the foot-in-the-door.

I've got some libertarian blood in me, so I haven't quite figured out my position on how or if broadcast companies should be regulated on content, but I'm pretty sure the founding fathers weren't thinking about protecting the rights of pornographers when they penned the Bill of Rights.

Regulating conventional broadcast companies is really inconsequential anyway. I have a feeling that even cable TV will be a dinosaur in 10 years, when we're watching everything via stream on the web.

One last thought, I think someone ought to send a warning memo over to the NEA just incase these porn studies effect anyone on their payroll.

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